Monday, November 20, 2017

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #593


I took a stab at entering The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #593 for November 20, 2017. The drawing is by Tom Cheney.

"I did receive your demands but I haven't
gotten around to them."


These captions weren't sharp enough:
"He's a cross between Martin Luther and Lex Luthor."
"What else do you want?"
"When did Pin the Amendment on the Lawyer become a game?"



Note:  Last week cartoonist Mick Stevens had all his ducks in a row. Line up for Contest #592.

This blogger has been stabbed in the back by Tom Cheney's caption contests before.

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Sunday, November 19, 2017

Follow the Fold: Otto Soglow in College Humor, July 1937


Cartoonist Otto Soglow's bank teller gets religion in four panels as seen in the July 1937 issue of College Humor. We know quite a lot about this teller: his name is Mr. MacIntosh, he works for the Bean Exchange(!), and he grooms a mustache that is about to go out of style forever.

Otto Soglow
College Humor, Vol 5, No. 3, July 1937, page 13


Note:  This cartoon was photographed in the July 1937 issue of College Humor, just one page out of some 5,600 publications in the Steven Boss humor magazine collection. You can find it in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University. A blogger could get lost in this collection for a very long time. I imagine someone without a blog could get lost too, but then who would know? The collection is accessible by the general public. Just contact Curator for Comics and Cartoons Karen Green. Be sure to blog about what you find, or send me a few pictures and I'll blog about them for you.  Really, how hard can it be?

Why isn't Otto Soglow better known? He was pretty popular in his day. Help me keep his work in the public eye on Attempted Bloggery. I am looking for high-quality scans or photographs of original cartoon art by Soglow and other artists whose work appeared in magazines like College Humor or The New Yorker. Examples of rare or forgotten published work like this bank teller cartoon are always desired.



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives


Otto Soglow


College Humor

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Saturday, November 18, 2017

A Chicken in Almost Every Pot: Otto Soglow's New Deal


A series of magazine covers done by cartoonist Otto Soglow for Judge in 1938 offers some insights on how Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal was embraced by the press. The covers are all intensely colorful economic parables of the Great Depression executed against a plain white background. The four recurring characters are second-term Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt, a farmer, a worker, and a capitalist, each trying to cope with the dire economic situation. Many an American president might be depicted as the advocate of agriculture, of labor, or of business, but it's unusual even during hard times for a president of either party to be depicted as the champion of all three.

On the April 1938 Judge cover, FDR is drawn as an acrobat on the flying trapeze executing a breathtaking midair catch of the farmer while immobile business and labor look on aghast. The May cover shows the three branches of the economy tangled around the maypole, with the capable President clearly taking charge of the awkward situation. The June cover alludes to the famous political promise of a chicken in every pot, one often incorrectly attributed to Herbert Hoover and embraced by the Republican party back in 1928 during more prosperous times. Note also that each cover depicts the President as physically vigorous and able-bodied, with no reference to the braces he required to stand or the wheelchair he required for mobility.

Otto Soglow
Judge, April 1938
Otto Soglow
Judge, May 1938
Scan by Dick Buchanan
Otto Soglow
Judge, June 1938
Scan by Dick Buchanan



Note:  Once again I offer my thanks to Dick Buchanan for providing Attempted Bloggery with two Judge cover scans from the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files. The April cover comes from Mike Lynch Cartoons to which Dick regularly contributes, most recently a post entitled, "Dick Buchanan's Favorite Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1964." See what magazine readers were laughing at during the postwar years with the Depression long behind them.

Otto Soglow was a prolific cartoonist who was especially at home with the wordless gag. Readers are encouraged to contribute scans or photos of original art or of rare published cartoons. I am especially eager to know whether there are any more Judge covers in this FDR series.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:



Friday, November 17, 2017

Otto Soglow: Staying Dry

It's January 1931, but you can be forgiven if you don't recognize that the Great Depression is upon us from this Judge cartoon by Otto Soglow. At least we know the importance during Prohibition of keeping dry.

Otto Soglow
Judge, January 1931, page 11
Scan by Dick Buchanan


Note:  My thanks to Dick Buchanan for providing Attempted Bloggery with access to this scan from the world-renowned Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files. Dick contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a post entitled, "Dick Buchanan's Favorite Gag Cartoons 1946 - 1964." Find out what people were laughing at during the years of the baby boom.

Otto Soglow was a prolific cartoonist with a special flair for the wordless gag. Readers are encouraged to contribute scans or photos of original art, rare published cartoons, and other Sogloviana to this blog. Did I just make up a word?


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:



Thursday, November 16, 2017

James Thurber: Marriages Are Made in Heaven

James Thurber, noting that "Marriages Are Made in Heaven," makes an appropriately celestial drawing on stationery of the École des Beaux-Arts. The composition and the figures are delightful, but note how oddly Thurber has linked the arms of the couple as if they are ribbons. There's no point where one person's arm ends and the other's begins. While this could be mere shoddy draughtsmanship, the looping arms might instead be meant to represent lines of orbit, something that would be in keeping with the heavenly theme of the drawing.


James Thurber
Marriages Are Made in Heaven

James Thurber
Marriages Are Made in Heaven




James Thurber
eBay Listing as  of November 13, 2017

James Thurber
eBay Item Description

James Thurber
Marriages Are Made in Heaven


Note:  I would love to see any other example of a drawing by James Thurber in which arms are linked in this strange manner, if such a thing exists anywhere else. Of course, any Thurber drawing is always welcome here, even an anatomically correct one, again if such a thing exists.

Happy 26th anniversary to my wife!


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives


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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

The Punning Otto Soglow

For the May 1948 issue of The American Magazine, cartoonist Otto Soglow ventured into the fraught world of animal puns. In point of fact, the cartoon gives us not one  pun, but two. We don't get to see a lot of punning cartoons on this blog. Maybe this will explain why...


Otto Soglow
"How do you expect to get any attention, deer? You haven't got the gnu look."
The American Magazine,
May 1948, page 107

Scan by Dick Buchanan


Note:  A tip of the hat goes to Dick Buchanan for providing Attempted Bloggery with a superb scan from the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files. Truth is, I never heard of The American Magazine until Dick mentioned it to me and sent a few scans. Dick contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: More 1960s Cartoons from PUNCH."


Ambitious readers with access to original art or other published rarities by Otto Soglow are encouraged to contribute scans or photos to this blog. Let's keep this unique cartoonist in the public eye.


Not counting my Caption Contest submissions, today's cartoons contains probably the most outrageous pun ever to appear on Attempted Bloggery. Readers are invited to dig into their own archives and submit other examples of punning cartoons with an equal or if possible greater groan quotient.



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:


Otto Soglow


Dick Buchanan

Puns

Attempted Bloggery's Gnu Age Index



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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Otto Soglow: It's the Law! by Dick Hyman

It's the Law! was a regular feature that ran in The American Magazine from 1934 to 1956. The series recounted some of the riduculous laws that remained on the books around the country. Written by Dick Hyman, it was illustrated with an appropriate blend of humor and absurdity by the matchless Otto Soglow.

Otto Soglow
It's the Law! by Dick Hyman
The American Magazine, February 1942, page 56

Scan by Dick Buchanan
Otto Soglow
It's the Law! by Dick Hyman
The American Magazine, October 1942, page 134

Scan by Dick Buchanan
Otto Soglow
It's the Law! by Dick Hyman
The American Magazine, Vacation Issue 1947, page 68

Scan by Dick Buchanan
Otto Soglow
It's the Law! by Dick Hyman
The American Magazine, February 1948, page 64

Scan by Dick Buchanan


Otto Soglow
It's the Law! by Dick Hyman
The American Magazine, June 1951, page 68

Scan by Dick Buchanan

Note:  Once again my thanks go to Dick Buchanan for providing Attempted Bloggery with superb scans from the legendary Dick Buchanan Cartoon Clip Files. Dick contributes regularly to Mike Lynch Cartoons, most recently a post entitled, "From the Dick Buchanan Files: More 1960s Cartoons from PUNCH."

Readers interested in further examples of It's the Law! by Dick Hyman with illustrations by Otto Soglow collected for Reader's Digest can look again to Mike Lynch Cartoons. The 2013 post is called IT'S AGAINST THE LAW by Dick Hyman and Otto Soglow.

Ambitious readers with access to original art, correspondence, or published rarities by Otto Soglow are encouraged to contribute scans or photos of said material to this blog.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Otto Soglow

Dick Buchanan

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Monday, November 13, 2017

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #592

Here is my entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #592 for November 13, 2017. The drawing is by Mick Stevens.

"There's not a Shakespeare in the flock."



Or maybe I should have gone with one of these...
"This time we have all our ducks in a row."
"I thought we agreed on penguins."



November 20, 2017 Update:  The Finalists



Note:  Last week cartoonist P. C. Vey gave us a Freudian bath. Take a deep dive into Contest #591.

See whether Mick Stevens has all his ducks in a row in the blog archives.

And, the question on everyone's mind, why a duck?

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Sunday, November 12, 2017

A First Edition of P. G. Wodehouse's Eggs, Beans and Crumpets

Eggs, Beans and Crumpets—which of these might you be? A 1940 first edition of Wodehouse's humorous short story collection is not in the best condition, but it still sells for a song.




P. G. Wodehouse
eBay Listing Ended June 16, 2017

P. G. Wodehouse
eBay Item Description

P. G. Wodehouse
eBay Bid History
Only four bids, but the one placed in the last six seconds is the one that counts




Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:


P. G. Wodehouse
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Saturday, November 11, 2017

You Can't Spell America Without ME, Signed

Obtained at a book signing on Friday, here's a brand spanking new copy of You Can't Spell America Without ME:  The Really Tremendous Inside Story of My Fantastic First Year as President Donald J. Trump. It bills itself as "A So-Called Parody by Alec Baldwin and Kurt Anderson," both of whom signed the book. Mr. Trump was preoccupied in Asia and could not himself be present at the signing.

You Can't Spell America Without ME:
The Really Tremendous Inside Story of
My Fantastic First Year as President
Donald J. Trump
A So-Called Parody
 by
Alec Baldwin & Kurt Andersen

New York:  Penguin Press, 2017

Signed by Alec Baldwin and Kurt Andersen


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

Donald J. Trump
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